AI Alignment Podcast: Machine Ethics and AI Governance with Wendell Wallach

Wendell Wallach has been at the forefront of contemporary emerging technology issues for decades now. As an interdisciplinary thinker, he has engaged at the intersections of ethics, governance, AI, bioethics, robotics, and philosophy since the beginning formulations of what we now know as AI alignment were being codified. Wendell began with a broad interest in the ethics of emerging technology and has since become focused on machine ethics and AI governance. This conversation with Wendell explores his intellectual journey and participation in these fields.

 Topics discussed in this episode include:

  • Wendell’s intellectual journey in machine ethics and AI governance 
  • The history of machine ethics and alignment considerations
  • How machine ethics and AI alignment serve to produce beneficial AI 
  • Soft law and hard law for shaping AI governance 
  • Wendell’s and broader efforts for the global governance of AI
  • Social and political mechanisms for mitigating the risks of AI 
  • Wendell’s forthcoming book

Key points from Wendell:

  • “So when you were talking about machine ethics or when we were talking about machine ethics, we were really thinking about it in terms of just how do you introduce ethical procedures so that when machines encounter new situations, particularly when the designers can’t fully predict what their actions will be, that they factor in ethical considerations as they choose between various courses of action. So we were really talking about very basic program in the machines, but we weren’t just thinking of it in terms of the basics. We were thinking of it in terms of the evolution of smart machines… What we encounter in the Singularity Institute, now MIRI for artificial intelligence approach of friendly AI and what became value alignment is more or less a presumption of very high order intelligence capabilities by the system and how you would ensure that their values align with those of the machines. They tended to start from that level. So that was the distinction. Where the machine ethics folks did look at those futuristic concerns, they did more so from a philosophical level and at least a belief or appreciation that this is going to be a relatively evolutionary course, whereby the friendly AI and value alignment folks, they tended to presume that we’re going to have very high order cognitive capabilities and how do we ensure that those align with the systems. Now, the convergence, I would say, is what’s happening right now because in workshops that have been organized around the societal and ethical impact of intelligent systems.”
  • “My sense has been that with both machine ethics and value alignment, we’ve sort of got the cart in front of the horse. So I’m waiting to see some great implementation breakthroughs, I just haven’t seen them. Most of the time, when I encounter researchers who say they’re taking seriously, I see they’re tripping over relatively low level implementations. The difficulty is here, and all of this is converging. What AI alignment was initially and what it’s becoming now I think are quite different. I think in the very early days, it really was presumptions that you would have these higher order intelligences and then how were you going to align them. Now, as AI alignment, people look at the value issues as they intersect with present day AI agendas. I realize that you can’t make the presumptions about the higher order systems without going through developmental steps to get there. So, in that sense, I think whether it’s AI alignment or machine ethics, the one will absorb the lessons of the other. Both will utilize advances that happen on both fronts.”
  • “David Collingridge wrote a book where he outlined a problem that is now known as the Collingridge Dilemma. Basically, Collingridge said that while it was easiest to regulate a technology early in its style development, early in its development, we had a little idea of what its societal impact would be. By the time we did understand what the challenges from the societal impact were, the technology would be so deeply entrenched in our society that it would be very difficult to change its trajectory. So we see that today with social media. Social media was totally entrenched in our society before we realized how it could be manipulated in ways that would undermine democracy. Now we’re having a devil of a time of figuring out what we could do. So Gary and I, who had been talking about these kinds of problems for years, we realized that we were constantly lamenting the challenge, but we altered the conversation one day over a cup of coffee. We said, “Well, if we had our druthers, if we have some degree of influence, what would we propose?” We came up with a model that we referred to as governance coordinating committees. Our idea was that you would put in place a kind of issues manager that would try and guide the development of a field, but first of all, it would just monitor development, convene forums between the many stakeholders, map issues and gaps, see if anyone was addressing those issues and gaps or where their best practices had come to the floor. If these issues were not being addressed, then how could you address them, looking at a broad array of mechanisms. By a broad array of mechanisms, we meant you start with feasible technological solutions, you then look at what can be managed through corporate self-governance, and if you couldn’t find anything in either of those areas, then you turn to what is sometimes called soft law… So Gary and I proposed this model. Every time we ever talked about it, people would say, “Boy, that’s a great idea. Somebody should do that.” I was going to international forums, such as going to the World Economic meetings in Davos, where I’d be asked to be a fire-starter on all kinds of subject areas by safety and food security and the law of the ocean. In a few minutes, I would quickly outline this model as a way of getting people to think much more richly about ways to manage technological development and not just immediately go to laws and regulatory bodies. All of this convinced me that this model was very valuable, but it wasn’t being taken up. All of that led to this first International Congress for the Governance of Artificial Intelligence, which will be convened in Prague on April 16 to 18. I do invite those of you listening to this podcast who are interested in the international governance of AI or really agile governance for technology more broadly to join us at that gathering.”

 

Important timestamps: 

0:00 intro

2:50 Wendell’s evolution in work and thought

10:45 AI alignment and machine ethics

27:05 Wendell’s focus on AI governance

34:04 How much can soft law shape hard law?

37:27 What does hard law consist of?

43:25 Contextualizing the International Congress for the Governance of AI

45:00 How AI governance efforts might fail

58:40 AGI governance

1:05:00 Wendell’s forthcoming book

 

Works referenced:

A Dangerous Master: How to  Keep Technology from Slipping Beyond Our Control 

Moral Machines: Teaching Robots Right from Wrong

 

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You can listen to the podcast above or read the transcript below. 

Lucas Perry: Hey everyone, welcome to the AI Alignment Podcast. I’m Lucas Perry. Today, we’ll be speaking with Wendell Wallach. This episode is primarily dedicated to the issue and topic of AI governance, though in order to get there we go on and explore Wendell’s intellectual journey in machine ethics and how that led him up to his current efforts in AI governance. We also discuss how machine ethics and AI alignment both attempt to serve the project of creating beneficial AI and deal with the moral and ethical considerations related to the growing power and use of artificial intelligence. We discuss soft law and hard law for shaping AI governance. We get into Wendell’s efforts for the global governance of AI and discuss the related risks. And to finish things off we also briefly touch on AGI governance and Wendell’s forthcoming book. If you find this podcast valuable, interesting, or helpful, consider sharing it with others who might find it valuable as well.

For those who are not familiar with Wendell, Wendell is an internationally recognized expert on the ethical and governance concerns posed by emerging technologies, particularly artificial intelligence and neuroscience. Wendell is a consultant and ethicist, and a scholar at Yale University’s Interdiscplinary Center or Bioethics. He is also a co-author with Colin Allen, Moral Machines: Teaching Robots Right from Wrong. This work maps machine ethics, machine morality, computational morality, and friendly AI. He has a second and more recent book, A Dangerous Master: How to Keep Technology from Slipping Beyond our Control. From my perspective of things, it seems there is much growing enthusiasm and momentum in the space of AI policy and governance efforts. So, this conversation and those like it I feel help to further develop my perspective and understanding of where we are in the project and space of AI governance. For these reasons, I hope that you’ll find it valuable as well. So, let’s get into our conversation with Wendell Wallach.

It would be great if you could start by clarifying the evolution of your thought in science and technology over the years. It appears that you’ve gone from being interested in bioethics to machine ethics to now a more recent focus in AI governance and AI ethics. Can you take us through this movement in your thought and work?

Wendell Wallach: In reality, all three of those themes have been involved in my work from the very beginning, but the emphasis has changed. So I lived a very idiosyncratic life that ended with two computer consulting companies that I had helped start. But I had felt that there were books that I wanted to get out of my head, and I turned those companies over to the employees, and I started writing and realized that I was not up on some of the latest work in cognitive science. So one thing led to another, and I was invited to the first meeting of a technology and ethics working group at Yale University that had actually been started by Nick Bostrom when he was at Yale and Bonnie Kaplan. Nick left about a year later, and a year after that, Bonnie Kaplan had an accident, and the chair of that working group was turned over to me.

So that started my focus on technology and ethics more broadly. It was not limited to bioethics, but it did happen within the confine for the Yale Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics. I was all over the place and the sense that I was already a kind of transdisciplinary thinker, transdisciplinary scholar, but having the challenge of focusing my study and my work so it was manageable. In other words, I was trying to think broadly at the same time as I was trying to focus on different subject areas. One thing led to another. I was invited to a conference in Baden Baden where I met Colin Allen. We together with the woman who started the workshop there, Eva Schmidt, began thinking about a topic that we were calling machine morality at that time. By machine morality, we meant thinking about how moral decision making faculties might be implemented in computers and robots.

Around the same time, there were other scholars working on the same themes. Michael and Susan Anderson, for example, had grabbed on to the title ‘machine ethics.’ Over time, as these various pathways converge, machine ethics became the main research area or the way in which this research project was referred to. It did have other names in addition to machine morality. It was sometimes called computational morality. At the same time, there were others who were working on it under the title of friendly AI, a term that was coined by Eliezer Yudkowsky. But the real difference between the machine ethics folks and the friendly AI folks was that the friendly AI folks were explicitly focused upon the challenge of how you would manage or tame superintelligence, whereby the machine ethics crew were much more ethicists, philosophers, computer scientists who were really thinking about first steps toward introducing moral decision making faculties, moral sensitivity into computers and robots. This was a relatively small group of scholars, but as this evolved over time, Eva and Collin and I decided that we would write a book mapping the development of this field of research.

Eva Schmidt fell away, and the book finally came out from Oxford University Press under the title Moral Machines: Teaching Robots Right from Wrong. So, as you may be aware, that’s still a seminal text out there. It’s still something that is read broadly and is being cited broadly, and in fact, it’s citations are going up and were even being requested by Oxford University Press to produce an update of the book. Machine Ethics was two parts philosophy, one part, computer science. It was basically two fields of study. One was looking explicitly at the question of implementing sensitivity to moral considerations in computers and robots, and the other side with really thinking comprehensively about how humans make moral decisions. So, arguably, Moral Machines was the first book that really took that comprehensive look at human moral decision making seriously. It was also a time when there was a lot of research going on in moral psychology in the way in which people’s affective and decision making concerns affected what became our ethical decision making processes.

So we were also able to bring some of that in, bring evolutionary psychology in and bring a lot of new fields of research that had not really been given their due or had not been integrated very well with the dominant reason based theories of ethics such as deontology, which is really ethical approaches that focus on duties, rules and consequentialism, which is an ethical theory that says right and wrong is not determined by following the rules or doing your duty, it’s determined by looking at the consequences of your action and selecting that course or the action likely to produce the greatest good for the greatest number. So it’s like we were integrating evolutionary psychology, cognitive science, moral psychology, together with the more rational-based theories, as we looked at top down and bottom up approaches for introducing sensitivity to ethical considerations in computers and robots.

The major shift in that whole trajectory and one I only learned about at the first FLI conference in Puerto Rico where I and Jim Moor were the only two people who had been actively involved in the machine ethics community, Jim Moor is a professor at Dartmouth, for those of you who are not aware of him, and he has been a seminal figure in the philosophy of computing for decades now, was at that Puerto Rican gathering, the concept of value alignment with race to us for the first time. What I realized was that those who are talking about value alignment from the AI perspective, by and large, had little or no understanding that there had ever been a field or was an ongoing field known as machine ethics.

That led to my applying for a Future of Life Institute grant, which I was awarded as PI. That grant was to host three annual workshops bringing together experts not only in AI, but machine ethics, philosophy, generally, resilience, engineering, robotics, a broad array of fields of people who had been thinking seriously about value issues in computational systems. Those really became groundbreaking workshops where it was clear that the computer scientists and the AI researchers knew very little about ethics issues, and the ethicists didn’t necessarily have a great depth of understanding of some of the challenges coming up in artificial intelligence. Bart Selman and Stuart Russell agreed to be co-chairs of those workshops with me. The last one was completed over a year ago with some closing presentations in New York city and at Yale.

Lucas Perry: I think it’d be helpful here if you could disambiguate the machine ethics crowd and way of thinking and what has been done there from the AI alignment, value alignment, Eliezer branch of thinking that has been going on. AI alignment seems more focused on explicitly trying to understand human preference hierarchies and be able to specify objectives without the machine systems doing other things that we don’t want them to do. Then you said that machine ethics is about imbuing ethical decision making faculties or reasoning or sensitivities in machine systems. That, to me, seems more like normative ethics. We have these normative theories like you mentioned deontology and consequentialism and virtue ethics, and maybe machines can invent other normative ethical theories. So they seem like different projects.

Wendell Wallach: They are very different projects. The question is whether they converge or not or whether they can really be treated totally distinct projects from each other. So when you were talking about machine ethics or when we were talking about machine ethics, we were really thinking about it in terms of just how do you introduce ethical procedures so that when machines encounter new situations, particularly when the designers can’t fully predict what their actions will be, that they factor in ethical considerations as they choose between various courses of action. So we were really talking about very basic program in the machines, but we weren’t just thinking of it in terms of the basics. We were thinking of it in terms of the evolution of smart machines. For example, in Moral Machines, Colin and I had a chart that we had actually developed with Eva Schmidt and had been in earlier articles that the three of us offered, and it looked at the development of machines on two axes.

One was increasing autonomy, and the other was increasing sensitivity with at the far other extremes, sensitivity to ethical consideration. We realized that you could put any tool within that chart. So a hammer has no sensitivity, and it has no autonomy. But when you think of a thermostat, it has a very low degree of sensitivity and a very low degree of autonomy, so as temperatures change, it can turn on or off heating. We then, within that chart, had a series of semicircles, one that delineated when we moved into the realm of what we labeled operational morality. By operational morality, we meant that the computer designers could more or less figure out all the situations the system would encounter and hard program its responses to those situations. The next level was what we call functional morality, which was as the computer programmers could no longer predetermine all the situations the system would encounter, the system would have to have some kind of ethical sub routines. Then at the highest level was full moral agency.

What we encounter in the Singularity Institute, now MIRI for artificial intelligence approach of friendly AI and what became value alignment is more or less a presumption of very high order intelligence capabilities by the system and how you would ensure that their values align with those of the machines. They tended to start from that level. So that was the distinction. Where the machine ethics folks did look at those futuristic concerns, they did more so from a philosophical level and at least a belief or appreciation that this is going to be a relatively evolutionary course, whereby the friendly AI and value alignment folks, they tended to presume that we’re going to have very high order cognitive capabilities and how do we ensure that those align with the systems. Now, the convergence, I would say, is what’s happening right now because in workshops that have been organized around the societal and ethical impact of intelligent systems. The first experiments even the value alignment people are doing still tend to be relatively low level experiments, given the capabilities assistants have today.

So I would say, in effect, they are machine ethics experiments or at least they’re starting to recognize that the challenges at least initially aren’t that much different than those the machine ethicists outlined. As far as the later concerns go, which is what is the best course to proceed on producing systems that are value aligned, well there, I think we have some overlap also coming into the machine ethicist, which raises questions about some of these more technical and mathematically-based approaches to value alignment and whether they might be successful. In that regard, Shannon Vallor, an ethicist at Santa Clara University, who wrote a book called Technology and the Virtues, and has now taken a professorship at Edinburgh, she and I produced a paper called, I think it was From Machine Ethics to Value Alignment to virtue alignment. We’re really proposing that analytical approaches alone will not get us to machines that we can trust or that will be fully ethically aligned.

Lucas Perry: Can you provide some examples about specific implementations or systems or applications of machine ethics today?

Wendell Wallach: There really isn’t much. Sensitivity to ethical considerations is still heavily reliant on how much we can get that input into systems and then how you integrate that input. So we are still very much at the stage of bringing various inputs in without a lot of integration, let alone analysis of what’s been integrated and decisions being made based on that analysis. For all purposes and both machine ethics, then I would say, bottom up value alignment, there’s just not a lot that’s been done. These are still somewhat futuristic research trajectories.

Lucas Perry: I think I’m just trying to poke here to understand better about what you find most skillful and useful about both approaches in terms of a portfolio approach to building beneficial AI systems, like if this is an opportunity to convince people that machine ethics is something valuable and that should be considered and worked on and expanded. I’m curious to know what you would say.

Wendell Wallach: Well, I think machine ethics is the name of the game in the sense that for all I talk about systems that will have very high order of capabilities. We just aren’t there. We’re still dealing with relatively limited forms of cognitive decision making. For all the wonder that’s going on in machine learning, that’s still a relatively limited kind of learning approach. So I’m not dealing with machines that are making fundamental decisions at this point, or if they are allowed to, it’s largely because humans have abrogated their responsibility, trust the machines, and let the machines make the decisions regardless of whether the machines actually have the capabilities to make sophisticated decisions.

Well, I think as we move along, as you get more and more inputs into systems and you figure out ways of integrating them, there will be the problem of which decisions can be made without, let’s just say, higher order consciousness or understanding of the falling implications of those systems, of the situations, of the ethical concerns arising in the situations and which decisions really require levels of, and I’m going to use the understanding and consciousness words, but I’m using them in a circumspect way for the machines to fully appreciate the ramifications of the decisions being made and therefore those who are affected by those decisions or how those decisions will affect those around it.

Our first stage is going to be largely systems of limited consciousness or limited understanding and our appreciation of what they can and cannot do in a successful manner and when you truly need a human decision maker in the loop. I think that’s what we are broadly. The differences between the approaches with the AI researchers are looking at what kind of flexibility they have within the tools I have now for building AI systems. The machine ethicists, I think they’ll tend to be largely philosophically rooted or ethically rooted or practically ethically rooted, and therefore they tend to be more sensitive to the ramifications of decision makings by machines and capacities that need to be accounted for before you want to turn over a decision to a machine, such as a lethal autonomous weapon. What should the machine really understand before it can be a lethal autonomous weapon, and therefore, how tightly does the meaningful human control need to be?

Lucas Perry: I’m feeling a tension between trying to understand the role and place of both of these projects and how they’re skillful. In terms just strict AI alignment, if we had a system that wanted to help us and it was very good at preference learning such that it could use all human artifacts in the world like books, movies and other things. It can also study your behavior and also have conversations with us. It could leverage all data points in the world for building a deep and rich understanding of individual human preference hierarchies, and then also it could extrapolate broad preference facts about species wide general considerations. If that project were to succeed, then within those meta preferences and that preference hierarchy exists the kinds of normative ethical systems that machine ethics is trying to pay lip service to or to be sensitive towards or to imbue in machine systems.

From my perspective, if that kind of narrative that I just gave is true or valid, then that would be sort of a complete value alignment, and so far as it would create beneficial machine systems. But in order to have that kind of normative decision making and sensibilities in machine systems such that they fully understand and are sensitive to the ethical ramifications of certain decision makings, that requires higher order logic and the ability to generate concepts and to interrelate them and to shift them around and use them in the kinds of ways that human beings do, which we’re far short of.

Wendell Wallach: So that’s where the convergence is. We’re far short of it. So I have no problem with the description you made. The only thing I noted is, at the beginning you said, if we had, and for me, in order to have, you will have to go through these stages of development that we have been alluding to as machine ethics. Now, how much of that will be able to utilize tools that come out of artificial intelligence that we had not been able to imagine in the early days of machine ethics? I have no idea. There’s so many uncertainties on how that pathway is going to unfold. There’re uncertainties about what order the breakthroughs will take place, how the breakthroughs will interact with other breakthroughs and technology more broadly, whether there will be public reactions to autonomous systems along the way that slow down the course of development or even stop certain areas of research.

So I don’t know how this is all going to unfold. I do see within the AI community, there is kind of a leap of faith to a presumption of breaths of capacity that when I look at it, I still look at, well, how do we get between here and there. When I look at getting between here and there, I see that you’re going to have to solve some of these lower level problems that got described more in the machine ethics world than have initially been seen by the value alignment approaches. That said, now that we’re getting researchers actually trying to look at implementing value alignment, I think they’re coming to appreciate that these lower level problems are there. We can’t presume high level preference parsing by machines without them going through developmental stages in relationship to understanding what a preference is, what a norm is, how they get applied within different contexts.

My sense has been that with both machine ethics and value alignment, we’ve sort of got the cart in front of the horse. So I’m waiting to see some great implementation breakthroughs, I just haven’t seen them. Most of the time, when I encounter researchers who say they’re taking seriously, I see they’re tripping over relatively low level implementations. The difficulty is here, and all of this is converging. What AI alignment was initially and what it’s becoming now I think are quite different. I think in the very early days, it really was presumptions that you would have these higher order intelligences and then how were you going to align them. Now, as AI alignment, people look at the value issues as they intersect with present day AI agendas. I realize that you can’t make the presumptions about the higher order systems without going through developmental steps to get there.

So, in that sense, I think whether it’s AI alignment or machine ethics, the one will absorb the lessons of the other. Both will utilize advances that happen on both fronts. All I’m trying to underscore here is there are computer engineers and roboticist and philosophers who reflected on issues that perhaps the value alignment people are learning something from. I, in the end, don’t care about machine ethics or value alignment per se, I just care about people talking with each other and learning what they can from each other and moving away from a kind of arrogance that I sometimes see happen on both sides of the fence that one says to the other you do not understand. The good news and one thing that I was very happy about in terms of what we did in these three workshops that I was PI on with the help of the Future of Life Institute was, I think we sort of broke open the door for transdisciplinary dialogue.

Now, true, This was just one workshop. Now, we have gone from a time where the first Future of Life Institute gathering of Puerto Rico, the ethicists in the room, Jim Moore and I were backbenchers, to a time where we have countless conferences that are basically transdisciplinary conferences where people from many fields of research are now beginning to listen to each of them. The serious folks in the technology and ethics really have recognized the richness of ethical decision making in real contexts. Therefore, I think they can point that out. Technologists sometimes like to say, “Well, you ethicist, what do you have to say because you can’t tell us what’s right and wrong anyway?” Maybe that isn’t what ethics is all about, about dictating what’s right and wrong. Maybe ethics is more about how do we navigate the uncertainties of life, and what kinds of intelligence need to be brought to bear to navigate the uncertainties of life with a degree of sensitivity, depth, awareness, and appreciation for the multilayered kinds of intelligences that come into play.

Lucas Perry: In the context of this uncertainty about machine ethics and about AI alignment and however much or little convergence there might be, let’s talk about how all of this leads up into AI governance now. You touched on a lot of your machine ethics work. What made you pivot into AI governance, and where is that taking you today?

Wendell Wallach: After completing moral machines, I started to think about the fact that very few people had a deep and multidisciplinary understanding of the broad array of ethical and societal impacts posed by emerging technologies. I decided to write a primer on that, focusing on what could go wrong and how we might diffuse ethical challenges and undesirable societal impacts. That was finally published under the title A Dangerous Master: How to Keep Technology from Slipping Beyond our Control. The first part of that was really a primer on the various fields of science from synthetic biology to geoengineering, what the benefits were, what could go wrong. But then the book was very much about introducing people to various themes that arise, managing complex, adaptive systems, resilience, engineering, transcending limits, a whole flock of themes that have become part of language of discussing emerging technologies but weren’t necessarily known to a broader public.

Even for those of us who are specialists in one area of research such as biotech, we have had very little understanding of AI or geoengineering or some of the other fields. So I felt there was a need for a primer. Then the final chapter for the primer, I turned to how some of these challenges might be addressed through governance and oversight. Simultaneously, while I was working on that book, Gary Marchant and I, Gary Marchant is the director of the Center for Law and Innovation at the Sandra Day O’Connor School of Law at Arizona State University. Gary has been a specialist in the law and governance of emerging technologies. He and I, in our interactions lamented the fact that it was very difficult for any form of governance of these technologies. It was something called the pacing problem. The pacing problem refers to the fact that scientific discovery and technological innovation is far outpacing our ability to put in place appropriate ethical legal oversight, and that converges with another dilemma that has bedeviled people in technology governance for decades, going back to 1980.

David Collingridge wrote a book where he outlined a problem that is now known as the Collingridge Dilemma. Basically, Collingridge said that while it was easiest to regulate a technology early in its style development, early in its development, we had a little idea of what its societal impact would be. By the time we did understand what the challenges from the societal impact were, the technology would be so deeply entrenched in our society that it would be very difficult to change its trajectory. So we see that today with social media. Social media was totally entrenched in our society before we realized how it could be manipulated in ways that would undermine democracy. Now we’re having a devil of a time of figuring out what we could do.

So Gary and I, who had been talking about these kinds of problems for years, we realized that we were constantly lamenting the challenge, but we altered the conversation one day over a cup of coffee. We said, “Well, if we had our druthers, if we have some degree of influence, what would we propose?” We came up with a model that we referred to as governance coordinating committees. Our idea was that you would put in place a kind of issues manager that would try and guide the development of a field, but first of all, it would just monitor development, convene forums between the many stakeholders, map issues and gaps, see if anyone was addressing those issues and gaps or where their best practices had come to the floor. If these issues were not being addressed, then how could you address them, looking at a broad array of mechanisms. By a broad array of mechanisms, we meant you start with feasible technological solutions, you then look at what can be managed through corporate self-governance, and if you couldn’t find anything in either of those areas, then you turn to what is sometimes called soft law.

Soft law is laboratory practices and procedures, standards, codes of conduct, insurance policy, a whole plethora of mechanisms that fall short of laws and regulatory oversight. The value of soft law is that soft law can be proposed easily, and you can throw it out if technological advances mean it’s no longer necessary. So it’s very agile, it’s very adaptive. Really anyone can propose the news off law mechanism. But that contributes to one of the downsides, which is you can have competing soft law, but the other downside is perhaps even more important is that you seldom have a means of enforcement if there are violations of soft law. So, on some areas you deem need enforcement, and that’s why hard law and regulatory institutions become important.

So Gary and I proposed this model. Every time we ever talked about it, people would say, “Boy, that’s a great idea. Somebody should do that.” I was going to international forums, such as going to the World Economic meetings in Davos, where I’d be asked to be a fire-starter on all kinds of subject areas by safety and food security and the law of the ocean. In a few minutes, I would quickly outline this model as a way of getting people to think much more richly about ways to manage technological development and not just immediately go to laws and regulatory bodies. All of this convinced me that this model was very valuable, but it wasn’t being taken up. All of that led to this first International Congress for the Governance of Artificial Intelligence, which will be convened in Prague on April 16 to 18. I do invite those of you listening to this podcast who are interested in the international governance of AI or really agile governance for technology more broadly to join us at that gathering.

Lucas Perry: Can you specify the extent to which you think that soft law, international norms will shape hard law policy?

Wendell Wallach: I don’t think any of this is that easy at the moment because when I started working on this project and working toward the Congress, there was almost no one in this space. Suddenly, we have a whole flock of organizations that have jumped into it. We have more than 53 lists of principles for artificial intelligence and all kinds of specifications of laws coming along like GDPR, and the EU will actually be coming out very soon with a whole other list of proposed regulations for the development of autonomous systems. So we are now in an explosion of groups, each of which in one form or another is proposing both laws and soft law mechanisms. I think that means we are even more in need of something like a governance coordinating committee. What I mean is loose coordination and cooperation, but at least putting some mechanism in place for that.

Some of the groups that have come to the floor are like the OECD, which actually represents a broad array of the nations, but not all of them. The Chinese were not party to the development of the OECD principles. The Chinese, for example, have somewhat different principles and laws that are most attractive in the west. My point is that we have an awful lot of groups, some of which would like to have a significant leadership role or are dominating role, and we’ll have to see to what extent they cooperate with each other or whether we finally have a cacophony of competing soft law recommendations. But I think even if there’s a competition at the UN perhaps with a new mechanism that we create or through each of these bodies like the OECD and IAAA individually, best practices will come to the fore over time and they will become the soft law guidelines. Now, which of those soft guidelines need to make hard law? That may vary from nation to nation.

Lucas Perry: The agility here is in part imbued by a large amount of soft laws, which will then clarify best practices?

Wendell Wallach: Well, I think like anything else, just like the development of artificial intelligence. There’s all kinds of experimentation going on, all kinds of soft law frameworks, principles which have to be developed into policy and soft law frameworks going on. It will vary from nation to nation. We’ll get an insight over time about which practices really work and which haven’t worked. Hopefully, with some degree of coordination, we can underscore the best practices, we can monitor the development of the field in a way where we can underscore where the issues that still need to be addressed. We may have forums to work out differences. There may never be a full consensus and there may not need to be a full consensus considering much of the soft law will be implemented on a national or regional view like front. Only some of it will need to be top down in the sense that it’s international.

Lucas Perry: Can you clarify the set of things or legal instruments which consist of soft law and then the side of things which make up a hard law?

Wendell Wallach: Well, hard law is always things that have become governmentally instituted. So the laws and regulatory agencies that we have in America, for example, or you have the same within Europe, but you have different approaches to hard law. The Europeans are more willing to put in pretty rigorous hard law frameworks, and they believe that if we codify what we don’t want, that will force developers to come up with new creative experimental pathways that accommodate our values and goals. In America, were reticent to codify things into hard law because we think that will squelch innovation. So those are different approaches. But below hard law, in terms of soft law, you really do have these vast array of different mechanisms. So I mentioned international standards, some of those are technical. We see a lot of technical standards come in out of the IEEE and the ISO. The IEEE, for example, has jumped into the governance of autonomous systems in a way where it wants to go beyond what can be elucidated technically to talk more about what kinds of values we’re putting in place and what the actual implementation of those values would be. So that’s soft law.

Insurance policies sometimes dictate what you can and cannot do. So that soft law. We have laboratory practices and procedures. What’s safe to do in a laboratory and what isn’t? That’s soft law. We have new approaches to implementing values within technical systems, what is sometimes referred to as value-added design. That’s kind of a form of soft law. There are innumerable frameworks that we can come up with and we can create new ones if we need to to help delineate what is acceptable and what isn’t acceptable. But again, that delineation may or may not be enforceable. Some enforcement is, if you don’t do what the insurance policy has demanded of you, you lose your insurance policy, and that’s a form of enforceability.

You can lose membership in various organizations. Soft law gets into great detail in terms of acceptable use of humans and animals in research. But at least that’s a soft law that has, within the United States and Europe and elsewhere, some ability to prosecute people who violate the rights of individuals, who harm animals in a way that is not acceptable in the course of doing the research. So what are we trying to achieve by convening a first International Congress for the Governance of Artificial Intelligence? First of all, our hope is that we will get a broad array of stakeholders present. So, far, nearly all the governance initiatives are circumspect in terms of who’s there and who is not there. We are making special efforts to ensure that we have a robust representation from the Chinese. We’re going to make sure that we have robust representation from those from underserved nations and communities who are likely to be very effected by AI, but not necessarily we’ll know a great deal about it. So having a broad array of stakeholders is the number one goal of what we are doing.

Secondly, between here and the Congress, we’re convening six experts workshops. What we intend to do with these expert workshops is bring together a dozen or more of those individuals who have already been thinking very deeply about the kinds of governance mechanisms that we need. Do understand that I’m using the word governance, not government. Government usually just entails hard law and bureaucracies. By governance, we mean bringing in many other solutions to what we call regulatory or oversight problems. So we’re hopeful that we’ll get experts not only in AI governance, but also in thinking about agile governance more broadly that we will have them come to these small expert workshops we’re putting together, and at those expert workshops, we hope to elucidate what are the most promising mechanisms for the international governance of the AI. If they can elucidate those mechanisms, they will then be brought before the Congress. At the Congress, we’ll have further discussions and a Richmond around some of those mechanisms, and then by the end of the Congress, we will have boats to see if there’s an overwhelming consensus of those present to move forward on some of these initiatives.

Perhaps, something like what I had called the governance coordinating committee might be one of those mechanisms. I happen to have also been an advisor to the UN secretary General’s higher level panel on digital cooperation, and they drew upon some of my research and combined that with others and came up with one of their recommendations, so they recommended something that is sometimes referred to a network of networks. Very similar to what I’ve been calling a governance coordinating committee. In the end, I don’t care what mechanisms we start to put in place, just that we begin to take first steps toward putting in place that will be seen as trustworthy. If we can’t do that, then why bother. At the end of the Congress, we’ll have these votes. Hopefully that will bring some momentum behind further action to move expeditiously toward putting some of these mechanisms in place.

Lucas Perry: Can you contextualize this International Congress for the Governance of AI within the broader AI governance landscape? What are the other efforts going on, and how does this fit in with all of them?

Wendell Wallach: Well, there are many different efforts underway. The EU has its efforts, the IEEE has its effort. The World Economic Forum convenes people to talk about some of these issues. You’ll have some of this come up in the Partnership in AI, you have OECD. There are conversations going on in the UN. You the higher level panels recommendations. So they have now become a vast plethora of different groups that have jumped into it. Our point is that, so far, none of these groups include all the stakeholders. So the Congress is an attempt to bring all of these groups together and ensure that other stakeholders have a place at the table. That would be the main difference.

We want to weave the groups together, but we are not trying to put in place some new authority or someone who has authority over the individual groups. We’re just trying to make sure that we’re looking at the development of AI comprehensively, that we’re talking with each other, that we have forums to talk with each other, that issues aren’t going unaddressed, and then if somebody truly has come forward with best practices and procedures, that those are made available to everyone else in the world or at least underscored for others in the world as promising pathways to go down.

Lucas Perry: Can you elaborate on how these efforts might fail to develop trust or how they might fail to bring about coordination on the issues? Is it always in the incentive of a country to share best practices around AI if that increases the capacity of other countries to catch up?

Wendell Wallach: We always have this problem of competition and cooperation. Where’s competition going to take place? How much cooperation will there actually be? It’s no mystery to anyone in the world that decisions are being made as we speak about whether or not we’re going to move towards wider cooperation within the international world or whether we have movements where we are going to be looking at a war of civilization or at least a competition between civilizations. I happen to believe there’s so many problems within emerging technologies that if we don’t have some degree of coordination, we’re all damned and that that should prevail in global climate change and in other areas, but whether we’ll actually be able to pull that off has to do with decisions going on in individual countries. So, at the moment, we’re particularly seeing that tension between China and the US. If the trade work can be diffused, then maybe we can back off from that tension a little bit, but at the moment, everything’s up for grabs.

That being said, when everything’s up for grabs, my belief is you do what you can to facilitate the values that you think need to be forwarded, and therefore I’m pushing us toward recognizing the importance of a degree of cooperation without pretending that we aren’t going to compete with each other. Competition’s not bad. Competition, as we all know, furthers innovation helps disrupt technologies that are inefficient and replace them with more efficient ways of moving forward. I’m all for competition, but I would like to see it in a broader framework where there is at least a degree of cooperation on AI ethics and international governmental cooperation.

Lucas Perry: The path forward seems to have something to do with really reifying the importance of cooperation and how that makes us all better off to some extent, not pretending like there’s going to be full 100% cooperation, but cooperation where it’s needed such that we don’t begin defecting on each other in ways that are mutually bad and incompatible.

Wendell Wallach: That claim is central to the whole FLI approach.

Lucas Perry: Yeah. So, if we talk about AI in particular, there’s this issue of lethal autonomous weapons. There’s an issue of, as you mentioned, the spread of disinformation, the way in which AI systems and machine learning can be used more and more to lie and to spread subversive or malicious information campaigns. There’s also the degree to which algorithms will or will not be contributing to discrimination. So these are all like short term things that are governance issues for us to work on today.

Wendell Wallach: I think the longer term trajectory is that AI systems are giving increasing power to those who want to manipulate human behavior either from marketing or political purposes, and they’re manipulating the behavior by studying human behavior and playing to our vulnerabilities. So humans are very much becoming machines in this AI commercial political juggernaut.

Lucas Perry: Sure. So human beings have our own psychological bugs and exploits, and massive machine learning can find those bugs and exploits and exploit them in us.

Wendell Wallach: And in real time. I mean, with the collection of sensors and facial recognition software and emotion recognition software over 5G with a large database of our past preferences and behaviors, we can be bombarded with signals to manipulate our behavior on very low levels and areas where we are known to be vulnerable.

Lucas Perry: So the question is to the extent to which and the strategies for which we can use within the context of these national and global AI governance efforts to mitigate these risks.

Wendell Wallach: To mitigate these risks, to make sure that we have meaningful public education, meaning I would say from grammar school up, digital literacy so that individuals can recognize when they’re being scammed, when they’re being lied to. I mean, we’ll never be perfect at that, but at least have ones antenna out for that and the degree to which we perhaps need to have some self recognition that if we’re going to not be just manipulable. But we’ll truly cultivate the capacity to recognize when there are internal and external pressures upon us and diffuse those pressures so we can look at new, more creative, individualized responses to the challenge at hand.

Lucas Perry: I think that that point about elementary to high school education is really interesting and important. I don’t know what it’s like today. I guess they’re about the same as what I experienced. They just seemed completely incompatible with the way the technology is going and dis-employment and other things in terms of the way that they teach and what they teach.

Wendell Wallach: Well, it’s not happening within the school systems. What I don’t fully understand is how savvy young people are within their own youth culture, whether they’re recognizing when they’re being manipulated or not, whether that’s part of that culture. I mean part of my culture, and God knows I’m getting on in years now, but it goes back to questions of phoniness and pretense and so forth. So we did have our youth culture that was very sensitive to that. But that wasn’t part of what our educational institutions were engaged in.

The difference now is that we’ll have to be both within the youth culture, but also we would need to be actually teaching digital literacy. So, for an example, I’m encountering a as scam a week, I would say right now through the telephone or through email. Some new way that somebody has figured out to try and rip off some money from me. I can’t believe how many new approaches are coming up. It just flags that this form of corruption requires remarkable degree of both sensitivity but a degree of digital knowledge so that you can recognize when you need to at least check out whether this is real or a scan before you give sensitive information to others.

Lucas Perry: The saving grace, I think for, gen Z and millennial people is that… I mean, I don’t know what the percentages are, but more than before, many of us have basically grown up on the internet.

Wendell Wallach: So they have a degree of digital literacy.

Lucas Perry: But it’s not codified by an institution like the schooling system, but changing the schooling system to the technological predictions of academics. I don’t know how much hope I have. It seems like it’s a really slow process to change anything about education. It seems like it almost has to be done outside of public education

Wendell Wallach: That may be what we mean by governance now is what can be done within the existing institutions and what has to find means of being addressed outside of the existing institutions, and is it happening or isn’t it happening? If youth culture in its evolving forms gives 90% of digital literacy to young people, fine, but what about those people who are not within the networks of getting that education, and what about the other 10%? How does that take place? I think that’s the kind of creativity and oversight we need is just monitoring what’s going on, what’s happening, what’s not happening. Some areas may lead to actual governmental needs or interventions. So let’s take the technological unemployment issue. I’ve been thinking a lot about that disruption in new ways. One question I have is whether it can be slowed down. An example for me for a slow down would be if we found ways of not rewarding corporations for introducing technologies that bring about minimal efficiencies but are more costly to the society than the efficiencies that they introduce for their own productivity gains.

So, if it’s a small efficiency, but the corporation fires 10,000 people and just 10,000 people are now on the door, I’m not sure whether we should be rewarding corporations for that. On the other hand, I’m not quite sure what kind of political economy you could put in place so you didn’t reward corporations for that. Let’s just say that you have automatic long haul trucking. In the United States, we have 1.7 million long haul truck drivers. It’s one of the top jobs in the country. First of all, long haul trucking can probably be replaced more quickly than we’ll have self driving trucks in the cities because of some of the technical issues encountered in cities and on country roads and so forth. So you could have a long haul truck that just went from on-ramp to off ramp and then have human drivers who take over the truck for the last few miles to take it to the shipping depot.

But if we’ve replaced long haul truckers in the United States over a 10 year period, that would mean putting 14,000 truck drivers out of work every month. That means you have to create 14,000 jobs a month that are appropriate for long haul truck drivers. At the same time, as you’re creating jobs for new people entering the workforce and for others whose jobs are disappearing because of automation, it’s not going to happen. Given the culture in the United States, my melodramatic example is some long haul truckers may just decide to take the semis closed down interstate highways and sit in their cap and say to the government, “Bring it on.” We are moving into that kind of social instability. So, on one hand, if getting rid of the human drivers doesn’t bring massive efficiencies, it could very easily bring social instability and large societal costs. So perhaps we don’t want to encourage that. But we need to look at it in greater depth to understand what the benefits and costs are.

We often overplay the benefits, and we under-represent the downsides and the costs. You could see a form of tax on corporations relative to how many workers they laid off and how many jobs they created. It could be a sliding tax. For corporations reducing its workforce dramatically, then it gets a higher tax on its profit than one that’s actually increasing its workforce. That would be a form of maybe how you’re funding UBI. In UBI, I would like to see something that I’ve referred to as UBI plus plus plus. I mean there’ve been various UBI pluses. But in my thought was that you’re being given that basic income for performing a service for the society. In other words, performing a service for the society is your job. There may not be anybody overseeing what service you are providing or you might be able to decide yourself what that service would be.

Maybe somebody was an aspiring actor would decide that they were going to put together an acting group and take Shakespeare into the school system, that that was their service to the society. Others may decide they don’t know how to do a service to the society, but they want to go back to school, so perhaps they’re preparing for a new job or a new contribution, and perhaps other people will really need a job and we’ll have to create high touch jobs such as those that you have in Japan for them. But the point is UBI is paying you for a job. The job you’re doing is providing a service to the society, and that service is actually improving the overall society. So, if you had thousands of creative people taking educational programs into schools, perhaps you’re improving overall education and therefore the smarts of the next generation.

Most of this is not international governance, but where it does impinge upon international considerations is if we do have massive unemployment. It’s going to be poorer nations that are going to be truly set back. I’ve been planning out in international circles that we now have the Sustainable Development Goals. Well, just technological unemployment alone could undermine the realization of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Lucas Perry: So that seems like a really big scary issue.

Wendell Wallach: It’s going to vary from country to country. I mean, the fascinating thing is how different these national governments will be. So some of the countries in Africa are leap frogging technology. They’re moving forward. They’re building smart cities. They aren’t going through our development. But other countries don’t even have functioning governments or the governments are highly autocratic. When you look at the technology available for surveillance systems now, I mean we’re very likely to see some governments in the world that look like horrible forms of dictatorship gulags, at the same time as there’ll be some countries where human rights are deeply entrenched, and the oversight of the technologies will be such that they will not be overly repressive on individual behavior.

Lucas Perry: Yeah. Hopefully all of these global governance mechanisms that are being developed will bring to light all of these issues and then effectively work on them. One issue which is related, and I’m not sure how fits in here or it fits in with your thinking, is specifically the messaging and thought around the governance related to AGI and superintelligence. Do you have any thinking here about how any of this feeds into that or your thoughts about that?

Wendell Wallach: I think that the difficulty is we’re still in a realm where when and what AGI or superintelligence will appear and what it will look like. It’s still so highly speculative. So, at this stage of the game, I don’t think that AGI is really a governmental issue beyond the question of whether government should be funding some of the research. There may also be a role for governments in monitoring when we’re crossing thresholds that open the door for AGI. But I’m not so concerned about that because I think there’s a pretty robust community that’s doing that already that’s not governmental, and perhaps we don’t need the government too involved. But the point here is, if we can put in place robust mechanisms for the international governance of AI, then potentially those mechanisms either make recommendations that perhaps slow down the adoption of technologies that could be dangerous or enhance the ethics and the sensitivity and the development of the technologies. If and when we are about to cross thresholds that open real dangers or serious benefits, that we have the mechanisms in place to help regulate the unfold into that trajectory.

But that, of course, has to be wishful thinking at this point. We’re taking baby steps at this stage of the game. Those baby steps are going to be building on the activities at FLI and OpenAI and other groups that are already engaged in. My way of approaching it is, and it’s not just with AGI, it’s also in relationship to biotech, is just a flag that are speculative dangers out there, and we are making decisions today about what pathways we, humanity as a whole, want to navigate. So, oftentimes in my presentations, I will have a slide up, and that slide is two robots kneeling over the corpse of a human. When I put that slide up, I say we may even be dealing with the melodramatic possibility that we are inventing the human species as we have known it out of existence.

So that’s my way of flagging that that’s the concern, but not trying to pretend that that’s one that governments should or can address at this point more that we are inflection point where we should and can put in place values and mechanisms to try and ensure that the trajectory of the emerging technologies is human-centered, is planet-centered, is about human flourishing.

Lucas Perry: I think that the worry of the information that is implicit to that is that if there are two AIs embodied as robots or whatever, standing over a human corpse to represent them dominating or transcending the human species. What is implicit to that is that they have more power than us because you require more power to be able to do something like that. To have more power than the human species is something governments would maybe be interested in that would be something maybe we wouldn’t want to message about.

Wendell Wallach: I mean, it’s the problem with lethal autonomous weapons. Now, I think most of the world has come to understand that lethal autonomous weapons is a bad idea, but that’s not stopping governments from pursuing them or the security establishment within government saying that it’s necessary that we go down this road. Therefore, we don’t get an international ban or treaty. The messaging with governments is complicated. I’m using the messaging only to stress what I think we should be doing in the near term.

Lucas Perry: Yeah, I think that that’s a good idea and the correct approach. So, if everything goes right in terms of this process of AI governance, then we’re able to properly manage the development of new AI technology, what is your hope here? What are optimistic visions of the future, given successful AI governance?

Wendell Wallach: I’m a little bit different than most people on this. I’m not so much caught up in visions of the future based on this technology or that technology. My focus is more that we have a conscious active decision making process in the present where people get to put in place the values and instruments they need to have a degree of control over the overall development of emerging technologies. So, yes, of course I would like to see us address global climate change. I would like us to adapt AI for all. I would like to see all kinds of things take place. But more than anything, I’m acutely aware of what a significant inflection point this is in human history, and that we’re having the pass through a very difficult and perhaps in relatively narrow doorway in order ensure human flourishing for the next couple of hundred years.

I mean, I understand that I’m a little older than most of the people involved in this process, so I’m not going to be on the stage for that much longer barring radical life extension taking place in the next 20 years. So, unlike many people who are working on positive technology visions for the future, I’m less concerned with the future and more concerned with how, in the present, we nudge technology onto our positive course. So my investment is more that we ensure that humanity not only have a chance, but a chance to truly prevail.

Lucas Perry: Beautiful. So you’re now discussing about how you’re essentially focused on what we can do immediately. There’s the extent to which AI alignment and machine ethics or whatever are trying to imbue an understanding of human preference hierarchies in machine systems and to develop ethical sensibilities and sensitivities. I wonder what the role is for, first of all, embodied compassion and loving kindness in persons as models for AI systems and then embodied loving kindness and compassion and pure altruism in machine systems as a form of alignment with idealized human preference hierarchies and ethical sensibilities.

Wendell Wallach: In addition of this work I’m doing on the governance of emerging technologies, I’m also writing a book right now. The book has a working title, which is Descartes Meets Buddha: Enlightenment for the Information Age.

Lucas Perry: I didn’t know that. So that’s great.

Wendell Wallach: So this fits in with your question very broadly. I’m both looking at if the enlightenment ethos, which has directed humanities development over the last few hundred years is imploding under the weight of its own success, then what ethos do we put in place that gives humanity a direction for flourish and over the next few hundred years? I think central to creating that new ethos is to have a new understanding of what it means to be human. But that new understanding isn’t something totally new. It needs to have some convergence with what’s been perennial wisdom to be meaningful. But the fact is when we ask these questions, how are we similar to and how do we truly differ from the artificial forms of intelligence that we’re creating? Or what will it mean to be human as we evolved through the impact of emerging technologies, whether that’s life extension or uploading or bioengineering?

There still is this fundamental question about what grounds, what it means to be human. In other words, what’s not just up for grabs or up for engineering. To that, I bring in my own reflections after having meditated for the last 50 years on my own insights shall we say and how that converges with what we’ve learned about human functioning, human decision making and human ethics through the cognitive sciences over the last decade or two. Out of that, I’ve come up with a new model that I referred to as cyber souls, meaning that as sciences illuminating the computational and biochemical mechanisms that give rise to human capabilities, we have often lost sight of the way in which evolution also forged us into integrated beings, integrated within ourselves and searching for an adapted integration to the environment and the other entities that share in that environment.

And it’s this need for integration and relationship, which is fundamental in ethics, but also in decision making. There’s the second part of this, which is this new fascination with moral psychology and the recognition that reason alone may not be enough for good decision making. And that if we have an ethics that doesn’t accommodate people’s moral psychology, then reason alone isn’t going to be persuasive for people, they have to be moved by it. So I think this leads us to perhaps a new understanding of what’s the role of psychological states in our decision making, what information is carried by different psychological states, and how does that information help direct us toward making good and bad decisions. So I call that a silent ethic. There are certain mental states, which historically have at least indicated for people that they’re in the right place at the right time, in the right way.

Oftentimes, these states, whether they’re called flow or oneness or creativity, they’re being given some spiritual overlay and people look directly at how to achieve these states. But that may be a misunderstanding of the role of mental states. Mental States are giving us information. As we factor that information into our choices and actions, those mental states fall away, and the byproduct are these so-called spiritual or transcendent states, and often they have characteristics where thought and thinking comes to a rest. So I call this the silent ethic, taking the actions, making the choices that allow our thoughts to come to rest. When our thoughts are coming to rest, we’re usually in relationships within ourself and our environments that you can think of as embodied presence or perhaps even the foundations for virtue. So my own sense is we may be moving toward a new or revived virtue ethics. Part of what I’m trying to express in this new book is what I think is foundational to the flourishing of that new virtue ethics.

Lucas Perry: That’s really interesting. I bring this up and asking because I’ve been interested in the role of idealization, ethically, morally and emotionally in people and reaching towards whatever is possible in terms of human psychological enlightenment and how that may exist as certain benchmarks or reference frames in terms of value learning.

Wendell Wallach: Well, it is a counter pose to the notion that machines are going to have this kind of embodied understanding. I’m highly skeptical that we will get machines in the next hundred years that come in close to this kind of embodied understanding. I’m not skeptical that we could have on new kind of revival movement among humans where we create a new class of moral exemplars, which seems to be the exact opposite of what we’re doing at the moment.

Lucas Perry: Yeah. If we can get the AI systems and create abundance and reduce existential risk of bunch and have a long period of reflection, perhaps there will be this space for reaching for the limits of human idealization and enlightenment.

Wendell Wallach: It’s part of what the whole question is going on, for us, philosophy types, to what extent is this all about machine superintelligence and to what extent are we using the conversation about superintelligence as an imperfect mirror to think more deeply about the ways we’re similar to in dissimilar from the AI systems we’re creating or have a potential to create.

Lucas Perry: All right. So, with that, thank you very much for your time.

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