Entries by Matt Scherer

Op-ed: Poll Shows Strong Support for AI Regulation Though Respondents Admit Limited Knowledge of AI

On April 11, Morning Consult released perhaps the most wide-ranging public survey ever conducted on AI-related issues.  In the poll, 2200 Americans answered 39 poll questions about AI (plus a number of questions on other issues). The headline result that Morning Consult is highlighting is that overwhelming majorities of respondents supported national regulation (71% support) and […]

Op-ed: On Robot-delivered Bombs

“In An Apparent First, Police Used A Robot To Kill.”  So proclaimed a headline on NPR’s website, referring to the method Dallas police used to end the standoff with Micah Xavier Johnson.  Johnson, an army veteran, shot 12 police officers Thursday night, killing five of them.  After his attack, he holed himself up in a […]

The Challenge of Diversity in the AI World

Let me start this post with a personal anecdote.  At one of the first AI conferences I attended, literally every single one of the 15 or so speakers who presented on the conference’s first day were men.  Finally, about 3/4 of the way through the two-day conference, a quartet of presentations on the social and economic […]

Digital Analogues (Part 2): Would corporate personhood be a good model for “AI personhood”?

This post is part of the Digital Analogues series, which examines the various types of persons or entities to which legal systems might analogize artificial intelligence (AI) systems. This post is the first of two that examines corporate personhood as a potential model for “AI personhood.”  Future posts will examine how AI could also be analogized […]

Digital Analogues (Intro): Artificial Intelligence Systems Should Be Treated Like…

This piece was originally published on Medium in Imaginary Papers, an online publication of Arizona State University’s Center for Science and the Imagination.  Matt Scherer runs the Law and AI blog. Artificial intelligence (A.I.) systems are becoming increasingly ubiquitous in our economy and society, and are being designed with an ever-increasing ability to operate free of […]

Too smart for our own good?

Source: Dilbert Comic Strip on 1992-02-11 | Dilbert by Scott Adams Two stories this past week caught my eye.  The first is Nvidia’s revelation of the new, AI-focused Tesla P100 computer chip.  Introduced at April’s annual GPU Technology Conference, the P100 is the largest computer chip in history in terms of the number of transistors, “the product of […]

Tay the Racist Chatbot: Who is responsible when a machine learns to be evil?

By far the most entertaining AI news of the past week was the rise and rapid fall of Microsoft’s teen-girl-imitation Twitter chatbot, Tay, whose Twitter tagline described her as “Microsoft’s AI fam* from the internet that’s got zero chill.” (* Btw, I’m officially old–I had to consult Urban Dictionary to confirm that I was correctly understanding what “fam” and […]

Who’s to Blame (Part 6): Potential Legal Solutions to the AWS Accountability Problem

The law abhors a vacuum.  So it is all but certain that, sooner or later, international law will come up with mechanisms for fixing the autonomous weapon system (AWS) accountability problem.  How might the current AWS accountability gap be filled? The simplest solution—and the one advanced by Human Rights Watch (HRW) and the not-so-subtly-named Campaign to Stop Killer Robots (CSKR)—is to […]

Who’s to Blame (Part 5): A Deeper Look at Predicting the Actions of Autonomous Weapons

Source: Dilbert Comic Strip on 2011-03-06 | Dilbert by Scott Adams An autonomous weapon system (AWS) is designed and manufactured in a collaborative project between American and Indian defense contractors.  It is sold to numerous countries around the world. This model of AWS is successfully deployed in conflicts in Latin America, the Caucuses, and Polynesia without […]

Who’s to Blame (Part 2): What is an “autonomous” weapon?

The following is the second in a series about the limited legal oversight of autonomous weapons. The first segment can be found here. Source: Peanuts by Charles Schulz, January 31, 2016 Via @GoComics Before turning in greater detail to the legal challenges that autonomous weapon systems (AWSs) will present, it is essential to define what “autonomous” […]